OLD WIVES TALES

How to Take the Sting Out of Texas Bull Nettle

Bull Nettle1East Texas- Texas bull nettle (Cnidoscolus texanus) is more than capable of defending itself from potential herbivores or an unwary naturalist. Bull nettle is a good plant species to know and respect! It has many uses and can be very beneficial, but it also packs a mean sting if you stumble upon it or fail to handle it properly. Most people who grew up in East Texas know to keep a sharp eye out for this plant. One sting from bull nettle is not something that will soon, if ever, be forgotten. >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

 

PSYCHIC PERSIMMONS

persimmon2East Texas– With fall in full swing and winter approaching people are curious about what Mother Nature has in store. If the Doppler radar bores you or if you enjoy a bit of folklore, there are other ways to predict the weather. >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNAKE MYTHS, SUPERSTITIONS, & OLD WIVES TALES

SnakeyEast Texas- Superstition has always regarded snakes with fear and respect and some cultures have even credited the serpent with various supernatural powers. There are more myths, old wives tales and superstitions about snakes than any other animal. Superstition has produced a number of popular misconceptions regarding snakes over the past few centuries, which have given way to numerous myths and old wives tales that have been passed down from generation to generation. >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

DOWSING FOR GRAVES & WITCHING FOR WATER

dowsingEast Texas- Some call it science others call it supernatural. Call it what you will, but dowsing has proven to be an effective method that has been used for centuries to find underground objects of interest. The art of dowsing can be traced back to the days of cave men through cave paintings and was officially documented during the middle ages. Not everyone believes in the ancient technique and some even say it is tied to witchcraft. Modern day dowsers use the technique to find lost graves, water, archeological sites, buried treasures, coal and oil. Dowsing and witching in East Texas could turn up anything from pioneers to buried treasure. >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

THUNDER IN JANUARY

lightningEast Texas- Thunder in January means more than rumbling in the sky to many East Texans. For many, many years East Texans have been predicting the weather by trying to make heads or tails of signs from Mother Nature. The state of the weather is often the first subject people discuss when they meet. If you are living in East Texas it is highly likely you have been hearing thunder that began yesterday evening on January 8. What does thunder in January mean? >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

 

CHICKEN POX CURE

chickenEast Texas- Some East Texans believe they know the cure for chicken pox. >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW DO YA LIKE THEM APPLES?

Horse Apple2East Texas- Horse apple trees, also known as Osage orange trees or Bois D’Arc trees, produce neither apples or oranges but rather a green brain-looking fruit. Horse apples are in the eye of the beholder according to who you are talking to. East Texans and their neighbors in Arkansas refer to the fruit as horse apples, while most people refer to horse apples when mentioning the remains after a parade in East Texas. >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAY NO TO SNAPPER SOUP!

Snapping TurtleEast Texas- Anyone who has spent a little time around ponds, slow-moving creeks and rivers, lakes, or the swamps and marshes of East Texas has probably seen a snapper. A snapping turtle that is. >>CONTINUE>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MIGHTY FINE RIGHT OFF THE VINE

Watermelon1East Texas- The Lone Star State ranks third in watermelon production in the United States. Watermelons can be purchased in almost every town in East Texas, either from a roadside fruit and vegetable stand or from the back of a peddler’s pick up. The fruit of the Pineywoods is a summer obsession East Texans can’t go without. >>CONTINUE>>

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